Thoughts from the Last Mile Welcome to the VillageReach Blog

Category Archives: Technology

07.19 2012

We recently sent out this latest update … here’s our news in case you missed it …

Malawi

  • update on our work to improve maternal and newborn health in Kwitanda
  • the latest on our Chipatala Cha Pa Foni (health center by phone) program, part of the Innovations for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health initiative
  • Mozambique

  • new update to our Mozambique Dedicated Logistics System (DLS) program
  • collaboration with the William Davidson Institute (University of Michigan) Supply chain & logistics study: new research to quantify the logistics challenges for a variety of medical commodities
  • Dr. Seth Berkley, President of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI) visited the DLS program
  • Technology Initiatives

  • ODK Scan: update on our collaboration with the University of Washington’s Computer Science & Engineering to improve the quality of data collection
  • OpenLMIS: new website with updated details on activities and partners
  • Social Enterprise

  • VidaGas: our collaboration with the ghdLABs program at MIT, to evaluate the marketplace for our social enterprise in Mozambique
  • New Additions to Our Team

    Malawi:

  • George Chinkwita – Project Officer, Kwitanada Economic Development Initiative
  • Erin Larsen-Cooper – Program Associate
  • Mozambique:

  • Antonio Gaspar Tomboloco – Field Officer, Niassa Province
  • See here for details …

    Updated Financial Report

  • our recently posted 2011 independent financial audit
  • We welcome your questions and comments,

    Allen Wilcox
    President

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    10.09 2009

    CIMG4849A few weeks ago I traveled to Malawi to work on two projects that use SMS phone technology. One of these projects focuses on providing community health workers (CHW) with an easier and quicker way to communicate with their local hospital, supervisors, and fellow community health workers. I spent an afternoon with 18 of the 21 CHWs in the Kwitanda province to understand how they would utilize such technology, and used that information to develop use cases (e.g. outbreaks, inventory shortages, emergencies, etc.) that will help them provide better health care to villagers in their catchment areas. For the other project, I met with shop owners, assessed the medicines they sell, and discussed the benefits of inventory management with them (which is of personal interest to a supply chain person like myself). The insights I gained through interacting with CHWs and shop owners were then funneled to our technology team, which is working on our upcoming Management Information System (vrMIS3).

    I am excited about the potential that these two projects will have for those working in rural and remote areas with poor road and electricity infrastructure and for us, who will be able to collect real-time information about what the needs are in the field and how we can develop programs and innovative approaches to strengthen health systems at the last mile.

    Although my time in Malawi was quite busy, I was glad to have had the chance to visit an under-5 clinic, where large numbers of women brought their children to be weighed (for growth monitoring purposes) and to be immunized. In Malawi, like in most of the world, women spend their days collecting water and firewood, washing clothes, caring for handfuls of children, tending to their fields, and preparing meals. Yet these women were willing to put their other duties on hold so that their children could receive vaccines and have a chance at growing up healthy. The health workers in Kwitanda have done a great job at educating these women about the importance of vaccines and health care for their children.CIMG4923

    -Jessica, Logistics Manager

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    06.05 2009

    Welcome to the VillageReach blog! This blog follows VillageReach’s progress as well as interesting ideas, projects and events at the intersection of health with social enterprise, technology & logistics.

    We ’re launching with our thoughts on the “Innovation Pile-up.” Chris Elias, the Executive Director of PATH, coined this phrase to describe the coming challenge facing public health systems around the world as years of medical research and development, particularly for vaccines, come to fruition.

    When VillageReach started working in Mozambique in 2001, we found there was no system for distributing medical supplies beyond the provincial level … a situation that’s unfortunately the norm in most developing countries.

    The Mozambique system was chaotic and under-resourced in 2001. Since then, the world has begun to invest heavily in new medical products, such as vaccines, to address the huge disease burden affecting developing countries. Governments, international organizations, and private charities have spent trillions of dollars in research and development of new products. But new opportunities bring new challenges. The new vaccines just starting to become available are much more expensive and are physically, much larger.

    For example, polio is a basic vaccine administered around the world today. Twenty doses of polio fit in a vial about the size of your little finger. At 13 cents per dose, the vial is worth only a few dollars. A twenty-dose, polio vial doesn’t take up much room in the refrigerator, and if the distribution system ruins a few vials, or has a few leaks in it, then the loss is not huge.

    In contrast, one new vaccine to prevent rotavirus, a stomach bacteria that kills thousands of children every year, costs $5 and is the size of your fist. The HPV cervical cancer vaccine is expected to be priced between $50 and $100 per dose in developing countries. The malaria and HIV vaccines, which we hope are coming soon, are also likely to be very expensive. Current distribution systems are overwhelmed now; the new products will swamp them.

    Unless we invest in improving the ability of developing countries to handle these new products, trillions of dollars of investment will be wasted and, more importantly, children in those countries will once again, be passed by. While we can get excited about new product developments, and rightly so, we can’t forget that our job is not done, until drops are in mouths, and needles are in arms.

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    Malawi healthcare worker