Thoughts from the Last Mile Welcome to the VillageReach Blog

Category Archives: Maternal and Child Health

03.26 2015

CCPF is an mHealth innovation developed and implemented by VillageReach and its partners in Malawi. CCPF was introduced to parts of Nkhotakota district in 2013 with support from Concern Worldwide Malawi. The success of CCPF in these select areas led Concern Worldwide Malawi and VillageReach to launch the services district-wide in Nkhotakota. This blog from VillageReach M&E Officer, Robert Saiti, describes the launch event that took place on March 12th. The expansion of CCPF means 65,000 more women and caregivers of young children will now have access to the service.

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02.18 2015

Have you ever forgotten about a doctor appointment? Or put off scheduling an appointment because you didn’t have the time? With all the schedules and activities we juggle today, missing or forgetting to schedule appointments is common. Often, we put off making an appointment until we feel sick or are in pain. Waiting to go to the doctor until something urgent happens becomes particularly dangerous for pregnant women when routine antenatal care (ANC) is critical for both the health of the baby and the mother. In Malawi, where maternal and child mortality rates are some of the highest in the world, increasing ANC can be integral to improving maternal, infant, and child health, yet routine ANC is not a common practice. Increasing knowledge and awareness about the importance of ANC is a key component to improving maternal and child outcomes.

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02.09 2015

VillageReach, in collaboration with D-tree, is proud to announce the implementation of a new mHealth application in Malawi. What an exciting partnership! During the first week of February 2015, 25 health surveillance assistants (HSAs), nurses and other health workers in Balaka District received intensive training on smartphone technology and the capabilities of a new maternal and neonatal health (MNH) assessment application developed by D-tree. Using smartphones to improve the assessment of pregnant women and their children will increase access to health care and improve the quality of care provided in rural villages.

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12.04 2014

The Role of Data Collection and One Community’s Path Toward Change

While working on the Kwitanda Community Health Project (KCHP), based in the Kwitanda catchment area, Balaka District, in southern Malawi, I have seen firsthand how critical the role of data collection is to improving health outcomes. In this rural and remote setting, the news of a maternal death spreads quickly, but quietly, almost like a rumor or story. “Did you hear? Another mother died in childbirth in that village. Another neonatal death occurred last week.” It is difficult to understand the causes of the death, or how often they occur because little information is collected and reported on these events.

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01.13 2014

A frontline perspective of the CCPF “Health Center by Phone” Program

When I trained as a midwife, I had no idea that I would be helping deliver babies over the phone. Technology has come a long way, especially in the district of Balaka in Malawi.

In September of this year, Mercy, a 24 year old pregnant woman from Dailesi village in Balaka, told her family that she wasn’t feeling well, and set out for Kalembo Health Center seated on the back of a bicycle driven by her neighbor.

Dailesi village is 12 km away from the nearest health center, and is located in a hilly area far from paved roads. The only transport available is by foot, by bicycle taxi, or–in case of emergency–by ox cart or bicycle ambulance.

After an hour of traveling, Mercy started feeling intense muscle contractions signaling the birth of her baby and could no longer sit on the back of the bicycle. Mercy asked the bicycle driver to stop in a nearby village so that the women living there could help her deliver her baby.

With no other transport available, still far from the health center, and without any skilled personnel nearby to help with Mercy’s delivery, her neighbor decided to call Chipatala cha pa Foni for assistance.

Chipatala cha pa Foni (CCPF), which translates to “health center by phone,” is a toll-free hotline that women in rural Malawi can call to speak directly with a hotline worker for information on pregnancy, newborn and child health, and reproductive health issues such as family planning. A VillageReach project, CCPF provides clients with advice they can follow at home, or refers them to a health center or hospital if they’re displaying “danger signs” which require further care. Women in the community can also sign up for CCPF’s “Tips and Reminders” mobile messaging service to receive regular text or voice messages tailored to their week of pregnancy or their child’s age.

Besides information and referrals, CCPF has also linked key services to the community, as in the case of transport. After visiting the CCPF Hotline Room, the Balaka District Transport Officer was so impressed with the potential of CCPF to save lives that he offered to assist in arranging transport logistics for callers in critical condition or in need of immediate care. He gave us his telephone number and requested that we let him know of any emergency transport needs.

Less than one week later, we took him up on his offer when Mercy called the hotline.

Rose Nkupsya, a nurse and CCPF hotline worker, answered the call from Mercy. Rose understood the urgency of the situation and informed the transport officer. He immediately responded by sending the district ambulance to pick up Mercy and bring her to the nearest health facility.

Before the ambulance could reach her, Mercy delivered a baby boy. Mercy was bleeding heavily when the ambulance arrived and needed to be helped by health workers. But she was afraid of being reprimanded by them for delivering her baby outside of a facility and was concerned that the nurses would not admit her. Over the phone, Rose reassured her, and Mercy agreed to go to the health center where the nurse on duty was able to stabilize her condition and successfully stop the bleeding. Had it not been for CCPF and the transport officer, Mercy would have suffered severe bleeding and infection. Fortunately, she and her baby boy received timely and appropriate care, and both are happy and healthy today.

Chipatala cha pa Foni provides an important service to women in four districts of Malawi, but our work is far from finished. I look forward to continuing to help women have safe pregnancies and deliveries and for children to grow up happy and healthy.

Learn More About CCPF

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